Book Recommendations


  • Pitcrew

    @rucket I honestly think Rothfuss is even more overrated than George R. R. Martin. At least people can claim they like Martin for other books than the Ice and Fire series.

    Rothfuss... has written one and a half books (Wise Man's Fear is the cliffhanger's cliffhanger, come on) and holds on to the shred of fame that gave him.


  • Pitcrew

    I want Rothfuss to write more, though. I do like his prose. But yeah, wise man's fear was...wow. He has 2.75 characters in either book that I actually give half a shit about. I wish he'd just write the adventures of Elodin. That, I would read.


  • Pitcrew

    Anyone have recommendations from Amazon's Unlimited subscription thing?


  • Pitcrew

    @shincashay I liked the Revanche cycle for political fantasy. Winter's Reach is the first book and is on Kindle Unlimited.


  • Pitcrew

    @kanye-qwest Is that the crazy magician professor?


  • Admin

    @kanye-qwest said in Book Recommendations:

    I want Rothfuss to write more, though.

    At this point I don't know what will happen first - George Martin's next ASoIaF book gets published, Doors of Stone does, or the thermodynamic death of the universe puts an end to all things.


  • Pitcrew

    @arkandel
    My money is on the ever popular real author dies and the series gets finished by someone else from his notes.


  • Admin

    @thatguythere There's been a worry for years George Martin might 'pull a Robert Jordan'.


  • Pitcrew

    @deadculture said in Book Recommendations:

    @kanye-qwest Is that the crazy magician professor?

    Yes. He and the uh, girl loan shark were the only characters I really liked.

    @arkandel Probably a book will be released as the last star fades out.

    As for GRR dying, I wouldn't personally care at all if ASOIAF never got finished, but this made me think 'what if they got Brandon Sanderson to finish this, too?" and then I laughed. What a tonal shift that would be.


  • Admin

    @kanye-qwest I'm ambivalent about Sanderson.

    On one hand I like his books, and The Way Of Kings is one of my all-time favorites. It's also really amazing from a logistical point of view how goddamn reliable the guy is - he's writing like a machine at the same level, and keeps churning out new novels right on schedule.

    On the other hand I find his works are increasingly ... well, teen-friendly. Maybe it's because a lot of his novels have specifically been aimed at that demographic but I still wish he'd write for adults as well.


  • Pitcrew

    I agree with what seem to be your thoughts on Sanderson, though I think the progression is backwards. if you read his earlier stuff, it is WAY more uh...juvenile and optimistic than, say, Way of Kings. Way more. I think he's making strides, even if I don't ever think he'll write anything you could call "gritty".

    But Way of Kings is coming along nicely, and I really liked Mistborn. Mostly. Ignoring the teenage romance. Mostly I read his stuff and marvel that his outlook on life is clearly much more positive than my own. I'll just be over here in the Joe Abercrombie corner of cynicism.



  • @Arkandel l @ThatGuyThere It probably will go that way with Martin, he has two planned books to go, the last took six years, coming after realizing he needed to add A Feast for Crows which took five years.

    I don't think I can read any of the last books if someone else finishes them. Considering that Martin realized the TV series was taking too much time away from his writing and that David Benioff and D. B. Weiss have all but split off from the books to conclude the books in the way they thought they saw it going. They say they have enough notes, but there is way too much missing from even the time Martin was more on board with consistency, I would just rather know where Martin is going for the conclusion rather than speculation; such as ...

    click to show


  • Politics

    The Deed of Paksenarrion is a very much 80s fantasy book and I adored it a bit for it. It's very much the old age of good vs evil, where there are benevolent and malign forces and it is very cut and dry in that aspect. But that doesn't become -as- much of a thing until later on. It follows a young lady who joins a mercenary company and actually describes that fairly well. I believe people have talked about the author having been a marine and that being part of it.

    It's very classic 80s fantasy in a way as said, but sometimes I enjoy getting away from the modern way of it.


  • Pitcrew

    I'm still enjoying Riordan's stuff. His climax to the Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard was a little bit underwhelming, to be honest, and The Trials of Apollo, while conceptually interesting, don't really do it for me. But they're still well-written and I continue to enjoy the world he's built. I think the problem is he spent so many books with Percy and Annabeth as the main characters that he hasn't really been able to build anyone else up to that level. When Percy and Annabeth show up, there's a different energy in the narrative. I can't find if he's announced anything new after The Trials of Apollo (other than his Rick Riordan Presents imprint) so that's odd.

    I started class again so I don't even have time to read, anyway. Bleh!


  • Pitcrew

    @arkandel said in Book Recommendations:

    I'm halfway through Skullsworn by Brian Staveley.

    I just finished listening to the audiobook of this. Narrator was awesome, book was very well done. Superior to the trilogy books in my opinion. Excellent interpretation of Death worship too that I may steal someday if I ever do a fantasy setting.


 

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