How to: make your poses less repetitive


  • Pitcrew

    Just had another thought on something that really improves poses: Slowing Down.

    Now, this isn't the case for everyone. Some people already take ten minutes to compose a pose, but if you're one of those people who whips back a pose in less than a minute, it's probably not quality.

    I'm not saying to start taking ten or fifteen minutes, but rather, just take a breath, think about what you're writing, and then before you hit enter, take a moment to reread it, clean it up if it needs it, or add another detail or two. Just spending an extra minute or so thinking over what you're doing really helps you be more interesting and put the breaks on your most common issues.

    Just the other night, I was in a scene and had many, many poses with 3 or more ellipses that I gladly would have sent out had I not paused to read what I'd written first.


  • Pitcrew

    @ganymede do you actually type the word "Break" in your poses to indicate a pause? Personally, I think it's TOO much of a pause. In the example it definitely took me out of the flow of what was being said. Beat works, break doesn't. For me, at least!


  • Politics

    @kanye-qwest said in How to: make your poses less repetitive:

    do you actually type the word "Break" in your poses to indicate a pause? Personally, I think it's TOO much of a pause. In the example it definitely took me out of the flow of what was being said. Beat works, break doesn't. For me, at least!

    Yes, I do.

    As you point out, there is a difference between a beat and a break. A beat is a short pause; a break is much longer one. It is a rare thing to use because simply writing 'break' indicates no movement or action other than the break itself. Still, a break ought not last longer than two seconds.

    And, yes, the intent is to interrupt the flow of conversation.


  • Coder

    One of the things that still bugs me about this pose setup that we have is that it is much harder to get banter. I can’t interrupt, and it looks strange if I pose after someone else with: “ I— Well yes, but— Can I get a word in please!” I’ve always felt it less an organic storytelling and more just waiting for my turn to write.

    It can be worked out when everyone else knows what you are trying to do, but there is no chance to interject into the break even if it enhances the pose or situation.

    So we usually return to waiting for our turn to write.


  • Pitcrew

    @ganymede said in How to: make your poses less repetitive:

    @kanye-qwest said in How to: make your poses less repetitive:

    do you actually type the word "Break" in your poses to indicate a pause? Personally, I think it's TOO much of a pause. In the example it definitely took me out of the flow of what was being said. Beat works, break doesn't. For me, at least!

    Yes, I do.

    As you point out, there is a difference between a beat and a break. A beat is a short pause; a break is much longer one. It is a rare thing to use because simply writing 'break' indicates no movement or action other than the break itself. Still, a break ought not last longer than two seconds.

    And, yes, the intent is to interrupt the flow of conversation.

    It makes me not want to keep reading, though. It makes me want to run down the court and wait for the pass.


  • Politics

    @kanye-qwest said in How to: make your poses less repetitive:

    It makes me want to run down the court and wait for the pass.

    You play basketball?

    It makes me want to swing back towards the hash marks on a slant.


  • Pitcrew

    @ganymede I mean I don't play much NOW but I sure did. I am very tall.


  • Politics

    @kanye-qwest said in How to: make your poses less repetitive:

    I mean I don't play much NOW but I sure did. I am very tall.

    I wasn't into theatre much when I was younger, but I am now.

    I suppose the word "break" more often than not makes me start singing Linkin Park.