Computer Science


  • Creator

    I don't know if it's alright to post this here, but this is a place for code, and I would be eventually applying what I learned to MU*s, so...

    I'm trying to build a solid mathematical foundation for learning the general inner workings of computer science, which I know is kind of a deep level of learning to code, but that's what I feel like doing.

    So I was wondering, what maths would you consider absolutely vital for learning linear and boolean algebra, and why? Also, is there any other high level math that you think is a great boon for computer science?


  • Coder

    Higher math is not necessary for the vast majority of coding/programming tasks.

    For deep computer science stuff, I'd refer you to the answers on an identical question on StackOverflow.



  • I would say rather than strictly math, you'd be pretty well-served by learning symbolic logic. I know it helped me immensely.


  • Creator

    @Derp I'd be interested in knowing more about this 0_o. What is it and how does it help?


  • Creator

    @faraday Oh I know, but there are ways that higher level math can be applied to coding that I'm very interested in, especially when it comes to stuff like video games (for example, Dwarf Fortress, or Minecraft).

    Thank you for that link! It's very useful!



  • Linear algebra is a freshmen year college course and typically has no prereqs. As long as you remember your middle/high school algebra you know enough. Linear algebra is helpful for 3D graphics and/or solving large systems of linear equations (like you'd find in a physics engine), but it isn't super commonly used in computer science per se.

    The mathematical topics that are really commonly used in Comp Sci are lumped together and called 'Discrete mathematics'. There's a book called 'Introductory Discrete Mathematics ' by Balakrishnan that we used to teach from in my TA days. It's a Dover book so it is one of the cheapest around, but it is a little densely written in places. If your basic math is shaky you might want to spend more on a book that elaborates a bit more. Just scan amazon for discrete math, there's lots of them.



  • @HelloProject said in Computer Science:

    @Derp I'd be interested in knowing more about this 0_o. What is it and how does it help?

    It's where you take a statement and substitute in a mathematical formula for it, which allows you to do geometry-esque proofs on it to make sure that it actually does what you think it does. It does a lot of the same stuff as boolean logic (if, and, not, or, etc), but comes at it from a slightly more approachable (and I feel, more widely applicable) way. For most people, it helps with reasoning and such, but really learning any form of standardized logic will help you immensely with understanding how computer stuff works, as they're essentially just logic machines.


  • Creator

    Excuse me for being late to this, but what are the prereqs of symbolic logic? And while we're at it, what are the prereqs of boolean algebra?

    My coding endeavours have been going well. I've actually been doing FreeCodeCamp, because it's good career-wise and college is dicking me around with trying to do financial aid anyway.

    Also, out of curiosity, I know it won't help me in the "real world", but do you think learning MUSH code is still worth doing for fun now, or is Evennia just going to totally take over and I'd be wasting my time coding with MUSH code now?


  • Coder

    @HelloProject I don't see Evennia taking over anytime soon. Why? Inertia. The genre and hobby is decades old now, the people who are used to it are used to using the older code bases. Even things like Rhost which added a lot of functionality remains the same on the surface of how to use it.

    Let's put it this way, they've been talking about Evennia for years now, and yet I've never seen a successful Evennia mush. They may be out there, but I've never seen it myself.

    As for learning MUSH code, it'll never really earn you dollars, but if you want to build a game using one of the other source codes, go right ahead.


  • Admin

    @Lithium said in Computer Science:

    Let's put it this way, they've been talking about Evennia for years now, and yet I've never seen a successful Evennia mush. They may be out there, but I've never seen it myself.

    Arx is huge. What's your metric for success?


  • Coder

    @Arkandel Never been on ARX. So never seen it. It has qualities in a game I dislike, I hate roster games, so I've never checked it out.



  • @HelloProject Your question about MUSHcode reminds me of my ex. She's a 3D modeler working on government projects that use software primarily designed for terrain modeling. She makes buildings with it.

    Their interns from the local university are flabbergasted at how different it is from the Maya/3DS Max (or whatever they're using now), which is intended more for modeling discrete structures. The ones who last beyond the internship are the ones who have learned 3D modeling, not just 3DS Max.

    It's similar with code. If you just approach it as "I use if() to match the results of an attribute, and you pull attributes with get()," then all you're learning is MUSH code. You might be able to occasionally apply that knowledge elsewhere, but it's a crapshoot.

    If you approach it by trying to figure out what it is you want to accomplish, and then analyzing the tools at your disposal, you'll get more out of it. Sure, until you get something else to use it will be hard to find out if you're "doing it right." But practicing symbolic logic, making project diagrams, putting comments in your code originals, these things build skills at coding vis-a-vis merely having skill at MUSHcode.

    FWIW MUSHes taught me that I so don't want to be a programmer. I'd say I'm 50/50 at coding vs just MUSHcoding. So... grain of salt and all that.


  • Pitcrew

    @Lithium said in Computer Science:

    Let's put it this way, they've been talking about Evennia for years now, and yet I've never seen a successful Evennia mush. They may be out there, but I've never seen it myself.

    Arx runs on Evennia I believe.

    Edit : Sorry posted as I read and did not realize I was beaten to this.


  • Coder

    @ThatGuyThere said in Computer Science:

    @Lithium said in Computer Science:

    Let's put it this way, they've been talking about Evennia for years now, and yet I've never seen a successful Evennia mush. They may be out there, but I've never seen it myself.

    Arx runs on Evennia I believe.

    Edit : Sorry posted as I read and did not realize I was beaten to this.

    And as I said even in the space you quoted: They may be out there, but I've never seen it myself.

    I don't play on ARX.


  • Creator

    @Jim-Nanban This is actually very helpful, and a part of my interest in computer science and such. So I think that I -can- gain something out of using MUSHCode, to be honest.



  • @HelloProject said in Computer Science:

    @Jim-Nanban This is actually very helpful, and a part of my interest in computer science and such. So I think that I -can- gain something out of using MUSHCode, to be honest.

    Honestly, MU code is one of the harder programming languages I've seen. It'll really force you to look at how, specifically, something needs to happen (from a data-manipulation standpoint) from beginning to end, and it will punish you if you do it wrong. Which makes it an excellent thing to learn when it comes to general data handling things and problem-solving skills.


  • Coder

    @Derp

    And if you're running large data sets? Hooboy!



  • @HelloProject said in Computer Science:

    Excuse me for being late to this, but what are the prereqs of symbolic logic?

    None. It's usually a freshman course offered by a Philosophy department. With respect to the folks recommending it, you won't really apply it directly to Comp Sci unless/until you get to formal proofs of correctness, which would come a couple years into a computer science degree. Probably as an elective.

    And while we're at it, what are the prereqs of boolean algebra?

    Basic high school algebra. It's not a very big topic. A university class usually won't spend more than a day (maybe two) on it. It's often (but not always) covered as a part of Discrete math. You can find books specifically on it, but they usually end up packing in some related stuff (like set theory, which is itself worthwhile) to get the page count up.

    My coding endeavours have been going well. I've actually been doing FreeCodeCamp, because it's good career-wise and college is dicking me around with trying to do financial aid anyway.

    If you're accepted somewhere, you should look into Summer of Code. You can qualify even if you haven't actually started taking courses yet.


  • Creator

    @Cheesegrater I was just gonna go to CCP (Community College of Philadelphia), which I'm not actually accepted into because my financial aid stuff is a bit wonky and I wanna make sure I can actually do it. Free Code Camp is actually a pretty amazing resource though, I've been looking into people's experiences with it, and it's already done more to kick me in the ass to actually doing shit than in all the years I've tried to do anything code-wise.

    edit: What's a good resource for learning MUSH code?


  • Coder

    @HelloProject said in Computer Science:

    edit: What's a good resource for learning MUSH code?

    Don't. Learn Python for Evennia or Ruby for Ares instead. :)

    But if you're a glutton for punishment, there's the classic Ambery's MUSH Manual, my journeyman level guide, or the tutorials on mushcode.com.


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to MU Soapbox was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.